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December 1, 2020

It was originally published in the early 2000’s, shortly after Jakob Nielsen’s. A must read for both professionals and enthusiasts. The goal is to make your website effortless to use, i.e. Be the first to contribute! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. This was a great book for a starting point to website UI design. Steve Krug (pronounced "kroog") is best known as the author of Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, now in its third edition with over 600,000 copies in print. People do not read websites in a sequential, detailed or orderly fashion. ... Don’t Make Me Think Revisited. Also, its a fairly short book, which was good. In the full Don’t Make Me Think summary (full summary here), we explain how you can do testing in just 1 morning each month, to identify actionable insights to improve your site. ebooks / Don't Make Me Think, Revisited, 3rd Edition.pdf Go to file Go to file T; Go to line L; Copy path abhijit838 Add files via upload. Effective web navigation must help users to (i) find what they’re looking for, and (ii) know where they are on the site plus what options are available to them there. Get more tips & details in our full text, infographic and audio summary! Get this from a library! You can’t imagine how nice it is to start your morning with someone you’ve never met telling you that they enjoyed something that you did. I'd bet most people could pick up a thing or two from it no matter how much web experience you have. Among the bits of knowledge Krug sprinkles, good web design is like the layout in a big box store, you should be able to look up and find signs that point you in the right direction. Since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design.Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it’s one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject. A website is self-evident when users “get” what it’s about and how to use it without having to think. These insights are not just relevant for web designers and developers, but also anyone who wants to understand how people behave and how you can make things more usable. make it self-explanatory, if not self-evident. Surely recommend developers and designers. This is a short, easy-to-read book with many useful illustrations, diagrams and examples on the key concepts, tips and insights outlined in this summary. Interesting, practic, easy to read! MUST READ for anyone with any say over the look & feel of a commercial web page (designers, managers, marketing people, executives, etc.). Thanks. Now Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don’t Make Me Think a classic–with updated examples and a new chapter on mobile usability. And he practices what he preaches - I picked this book in large part because of its clear, attractive, reader-friendly design. global vs local navigation, site ID, sections & subsections, utilities, search bars, page name, “You are here” indicators), and (iii) how to test the effectiveness of your site navigation. In our complete 16-page summary, we also outline the key considerations and tips for (i) mobile usability, (ii) maintaining goodwill, (iii) accessibility issues and (iv) gaining management support for web usability improvements. This book gives you insights into how to make a website easy to use. Now Steve Krug has rewritten the book for the mobile generation. How do you design your site for quick and easy scanning? Since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design.Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it’s one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject. I could list dozens of other things that visitors to a site shouldn’t spend their time thinking about, like: Ø Where am I? December 24th 2013 Make everything on your site “obvious and clickable.” If your users have to ask about how things work, they’ll get distracted. Here’s why I wrote it: In 1999, I’d spent ten years as a usability consultant helping my clients make their products easier to use. BUT the book is a little bit outdated especially the mobile view part. Don't Make Me Think, Revisited A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability The book's premise is that a good software program or web site should let users accomplish their intended tasks as easily and directly as possible. Don’t Make Me Think is the title of a book by the HCI and Usability engineer Steve Krug. It looks like we don't have any Plot Summaries for this title yet. I had a pact with some fellow web nerds at work to read a book on usability to improve our websites. I read this handbook on Web usability for work related reasons. Well, this is an absolute gem of a book. ince Don’t Make Me Think was first published nearly five years ago, people have been wonderful about the book. Usability is basically how easy it is too efficiently use a website. It's a quick read, but you may want to take your time on it a bit to make sure you fully register everything he says. In the book / our full summary, we elaborate on why/how to (i) use existing conventions, (ii) use effective visual hierarchies, (iii) format your content for easy scanning, (iv) make every click mindless and obvious, and (v) remove distractions or “noise” on your website. O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from 200+ publishers. Don’t Make Me Think. After this book arrived, I realized it was the first-edition, which I assumed would make it woefully outdated in our fast-moving digital world. Remove all unnecessary words to reduce distractions, allow the key content to stand out, and shorten the page to minimize scrolling. A lot of what Krug brings up in the first half seems like common sense, but he does delve deeper into some points, which may be helpful for some. Welcome back. Ironic that this book makes the reader think - think about design and views on life, all at once. This 2013 edition was updated with newer examples and to additional landscape changes since 2000. I had a pact with some fellow web nerds at work to read a book on usability to improve our websites. By 2002, I began to get a few emails a year from readers asking (very politely) if I’d A no nonsense approach on how to design web sites to be as effective as possible. Don't Make Me Think A Common Sense Approach To Web Usability, Second Edition, Steve Krug-- Review. Click here for the full summary]. Krug believes that the number of clicks doesn’t matter, so long as each click is mindless (i.e. It also covers the importance and basics of usability testing. It looks like we don't have a Synopsis for this title yet. As a rule of thumb, (i) make clickable links/buttons obvious and (ii) use words that are obvious to everyone. Ø Where did they put ____ ? It provides logical guided procedures for any stakeholder to understand the overall objectives of the website and make business d, Usability hardly concerns strictly web use. It's in full color with a couple of helpful diagrams, but I mostly found the comics in it annoying and patronizing. After reading it over a couple of hours and putting its ideas to work for the past five years, I can say it has done more to improve my abilities as a Web designer than any other book. For the full details, examples and tips, do get a copy of the book, or get a detailed overview with our complete book summary bundle. That’s because usability is fundamentally about human psychology, which is slow to change. 0 Chapter 6. Also, makes many design decisions easy by providing research based and diplomatic responses to many territorial squabbles that arise when sites are designed/redesigned. The second edition adds information on treating users well and designing for accessibility while trimming the focus on how to conduct usability testing. showed me how to put myself in the position of the person who uses my site. There is one crucial different between a brick and mortar store and its online counterpart: if you can’t navigate your way to what you want in a store, you can always ask someone. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Don't Make Me Think, Revisited. We’d love your help. “It’s a fact: People won’t use your web site if they can’t find their way around it.” Here we get proof again, that, internet professionals, web users, psychology interest, Usability hardly concerns strictly web use. Without outstanding user experience, your software will fail. I remember seeing the cover _everywhere_ for a long time but never looked into what it was. I picked up several interesting insights and tips and found the wh. It has been a number of years since I first skimmed this book and I found the changes welcome. Book Summary – Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach To Web Usability, Click here to download the Don't Make Me Think summary & infographic. It teaches UX designers how to deliver great user experiences in a very simple and accessible way. This is the overarching rule. Still, I jumped in--and was surprised to discover that almost all of its information remains pertinent and valuable. Building a great website isn’t just about technology or design; it’s also about understanding human psychology. Except for the past year, I’ve been a backend software engineer for backend code in data platforms, web apps, and operations. You can hire usability consultants from $5-10k, but it’s also possible to do DIY testing using the tips in this book. Don't Make Me Think A Common Sense Approach To Web Usability, Second Edition, Steve Krug-- Review Don't Make Me Think is a book about web usability. It's mostly focused on web and by extension mobile applications (digital interfaces). no thinking required) and obvious (i.e. The first edition was published in 2000 and then it was revisited in 2014 making it relevant and useful nowadays. Book Summary - Clockwork: Design Your Business to Run Itself, Book Summary - Man’s Search For Meaning (Viktor Frankl), Psychology, Economics, Sociology & General. [We elaborate on these changes in our full Don’t Make Me Think summary. Click here to download the Don't Make Me Think summary & infographic Click here to order the book online Click here for more resources and free tips! Since Don't Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug's guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design. In this book, Krug shows you how to make things easy for visitors to your site by making sure everything on it is obvious at a glance and easy to find and get to. Granted, many of its examples are of long-outdated sites (including--fascinatingly--Amazon's early days). In the book and our complete 16-page summary, we elaborate on these ideas and break down what it means in terms of web design, navigation and home page design. It’s always been the elusive facet of product development that Ive appreciated, but never come to understand. Once you understand how the human brain works, you can continue to apply the insights even as technology and landscapes evolve. I have been designing websites and web bases applications for years and haven't ever stopped to think about usability, the 1st impression, and how to accomplish these effectively. 'Don't Make Me Think' was the the UX bible before UX was a thing. It’s about web usability and damn is it good. Avoid technical jargon, clever-but-confusing marketing phrases, or terms that’re specific to your industry/company. This second edition of what could be considered the definitive book on web design. This book is what it states - a common sense approach to web usability. Note: “Website” in this article refers generically to both websites and web/mobile apps. But it's amazing how the basic principles have changed not at all. My biggest complaint with the book continues to be a lack of a summary or checklist on the high level points with references to where the topic is covered in more detail. Krug reminds us that ‘ease of use’ is easily the make or break deal for any website. Whereas Jakob Nielsen’s classic usability books are chock-full of statistics and details, this book is a new approach to usability, stripped down to what is practical and quickly measurable. An excellent introduction to creating usable websites.

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